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Microsoft SQL or Oracle

If the following question has already been asked please provide me any links
else
Is there any white paper or guideline about when JDE OneWorld installation needs to run with SQL 7.0, SQL 2000 or Oracle. I am looking for real figures of how many users are supported by the database given. I have heard that Mircosoft SQL Server for OW does not support more than 50 users. Is that correct? Has anybody any live figures about that issue.

Thanks for response
 
Actually it's false. SQL can manage more than 50 users for Oneworld.

There is several white papers and workbenches about it in the Knowledge Garden.

Harold
OW B7332 SP11.3
NT 4.0 SP6
Oracle 8.1.6
C++ SP 3
 

JEMILLER

VIP Member
Roland,

Only the SQL Server 7.0 Small Business edition is configured so that its performance is limited to support an average volume of 50 users. The Standard and Enterprise editions have no performance limiting functionality.

From the Microsoft preparedness review:

"The performance of the BackOffice Small Business Server Edition is limited to the throughput typical of 50 concurrent users, although individual BackOffice Small Business Server installations may be licensed for fewer than 50 users. BackOffice Small Business Server runs on both Windows NT Server (standard) and Windows NT Server, Enterprise Edition. To make maximum use of resources for the target market of SBS, the SBS Edition of SQL Server has a limit to the amount of concurrent activity that it will support. It also has a maximum database size of 10 GB. A maximum of 4 processors per SMP system is supported."

"SQL Server will accept a maximum of 32767 user connections. This limit is not related to the performance throughput limitation or licensing, it refers only to the number of physical connections made to SQL Server. A single client computer can open multiple simultaneous connections and will only be counted as one license. The performance throughput is simply based upon server load. Once the load reaches the throughput typical of 50 concurrent users, performance will be degraded, regardless of how many user connections or licensed users it takes to reach this threshold. SQL Server will continue to accept new connections and process requests, however response time will be delayed in an amount relative to how much the throughput limit has been exceeded."

Oracle has no limiting or license control functionality built into it.

I have seen a number of case studies that describe specific combinations of Database platform, Operating System and Hardware. Your JDE sales representative or client manager can get these for you.

Both Oracle and SQL Server have been scaled to support a large number of OneWorld users. It really depends on your particular hardware configuration.

Regards,

Justin Miller
justin.miller@teamspot.com

working with B7332 and XE on AS/400, NT, Solaris and AIX
 

roland_rueegg15

Active Member
AW: Microsoft SQL or Oracle

Harold,

Do you have any good links on the KG or do know by experience that Microsoft
SQL is powerful enough to drive eg 250 OneWorld users.

Thanks in advance
Cheers
Roland.

-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: owner-jdelistml@jdelist.com [mailto:eek:wner-jdelistml@jdelist.com]Im
Auftrag von hrodriguez
Gesendet: Montag, 26. Februar 2001 23:01
An: jdelistml@jdelist.com
Betreff: Re: Microsoft SQL or Oracle


Actually it's false. SQL can manage more than 50 users for Oneworld.

There is several white papers and workbenches about it in the Knowledge
Garden.

Harold
OW B7332 SP11.3
NT 4.0 SP6
Oracle 8.1.6
C++ SP 3

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SSAJAROFF

Reputable Poster
Roland :

I don't know if SQL Server may drive 250 users, but I do have customers
with 120-150 users on SQL7 and they're satisfied with the their DBMS.
Of course, all my SQL7 customers require intensive tuning and DBA
control activities from myself and/or their DBAs.
It's definitely false that SQL7 runs without any DBA intervention!
The user limit also depend on what UBEs your users run, some heavily
"full-scan written" UBEs (like Z1) may kill SQL7 performance even with
just 20 users on a 2x700 Mhz + 2 Gb RAM Server.
Many performance problems come from JDE installation itself.
For example, when you install NT/SQL OneWorld you can't decide on what
filegroup will tables and indexes be created.
I know that NT/Oracle installations have similar restrictions too.

Sebastian Sajaroff

B7321 to Xe, NT/SQL
 
AW: Microsoft SQL or Oracle

This is also my opinion, most Performance problems already appear by the
installation of the Database. It is absolute necessary to pay attention that
the Tables, the Indexes and the Logs are in each case on seperate
partitions, or Harddisks.

Kind regards

Bernd



-----Ursprungliche Nachricht-----
Von: SSAJAROFF [mailto:SSAJAROFF@grupoassa.com]
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 28. Februar 2001 13:43
An: jdelistml@jdelist.com
Betreff: RE: Microsoft SQL or Oracle


Roland :

I don't know if SQL Server may drive 250 users, but I do have customers
with 120-150 users on SQL7 and they're satisfied with the their DBMS.
Of course, all my SQL7 customers require intensive tuning and DBA
control activities from myself and/or their DBAs.
It's definitely false that SQL7 runs without any DBA intervention!
The user limit also depend on what UBEs your users run, some heavily
"full-scan written" UBEs (like Z1) may kill SQL7 performance even with
just 20 users on a 2x700 Mhz + 2 Gb RAM Server.
Many performance problems come from JDE installation itself.
For example, when you install NT/SQL OneWorld you can't decide on what
filegroup will tables and indexes be created.
I know that NT/Oracle installations have similar restrictions too.

Sebastian Sajaroff

B7321 to Xe, NT/SQL





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I am on OW 7331 SP6 NT SQL 7.0, Ent. Server dual processor, 500 Mhz, 1 GB
RAM, WTS-dual proc, 700 Mhz, 4 GB RAM.
I have observed that whenever there are 4~5 baches posted, system takes hell
lot of time....Any solution to this problem or how we can speed up th e
process.

Mrityunjay Kumar
HCL Perot Systems
Noida, India
 

richardjackson

Active Member
If you mean GL Post, please consider that GL post is a single-thread only
job. If this has changed, that change is recent (since B7331). If you run
multiple threads of GL post, you may be confident that bad things will
happen to your database integrity. Running concurrent GL Post used to cause
problems in the F0902 file.

On the general performance question. Imagine that you run one post job and
it uses 80 percent of the CPU cycles. Suppose that you run that job again
but immediately start a second post job - in other words, there are two jobs
running concurrently. The second job also wants 80 percent of the cpu
cycles but it can't have them because 80 percent for the first job plus 80
for the second job is more than the machine can provide. Instead of
violating the laws of nature, the two jobs share the cpu resources equally.
The two jobs each get 50 percent of the cpu cycles or 62.5 percent of what
they had before. (50 percent divided by 80 percent = 5/8 = 0.625). Since
the job can't get the resources that it normally does it, it runs more
slowly than normal and therefore takes longer than normal. The jobs will
take 1 divided by 5/8 or 1.6 times as long.

If you run three jobs, each job gets 33 percent instead of 80 percent and,
taken together, each job takes 1 divided by 33/80 or 2.42 times as long.

Suppose that the job originally used 50 percent of the CPU (instead of 80
percent) when it ran. If two jobs were run, they would need 100 percent of
the cpu and that is possible. If three jobs were run, they would require
150 percent, that is not possible, so each job would get 33 percent instead
of 50 percent and would slow down by a factor of 1 divided by 33/50.

In general, if the sum of the empty-system-percentage requirement is less
than 100 percent, and there are no other factors, the jobs should run at
full speed. When the empty-system-percentages are added together and the
sum is greater than 100 percent, each task will take longer than the
empty-system time.

There are other factors. In the computations above, the relationship
between requirement and slowdown is estimated using a linear relationship.
In fact the relationship is exponential. When one job runs, it uses memory,
disk drives, and network resources in certain quantities. When more than
one job runs, they compete for these resources. As component utilization
levels increase, the time delays introduced by this competition increases at
an exponential rate instead of a linear rate. These factors interact in
complex but straightforward ways.

Richard Jackson
 
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