• Introducing Dark Mode! Switch by clicking on the lightbulb icon next to Search or by clicking on Default style at the bottom left of the page!

Visual Studio 2010 intellisense

nkuebelbeck

VIP Member
Is it possible to get intellisense working in visual studio 2010?

This is going to be a long project if I can't get some autocomplete help!
 

BOster

Legendary Poster
Yes. I have used it since VS 2005. I wrote a detail article on it for jdetips.

In a nut shell:

Dont run VS from OMW. Just keep it open all the time. You will need a project.

1. Create a VS makefile project
2. In the setup wizard add the following:
Include Search Path: C:\e900\system\include;C:\e900\DV900\include
Command: C:\e900\system\bin32\activConsole.exe

Your paths may vary. Command is optional. It allows you to launch JDE for debugging as an alternative to attaching to the process.

3. Add your .c and .h files by selecting "add existing...". You only need to add the files you are editing, Intellisense will dynamically parse all #includes.

4. Enjoy code completion, reference lookup, etc.

In addition to intellisense you can have project for what ever you are working on and if you have to go back you can see all the C source code files saved along with notes, breakpoints, bookmarks, etc.
 

jdelisths

Reputable Poster
In addition to Brian's post, you can set the command to LaunchUBE.exe and call your business function from a test harness UBE. We use this approach to debug business functions.
 

nkuebelbeck

VIP Member
Yes. I have used it since VS 2005. I wrote a detail article on it for jdetips.

In a nut shell:

Dont run VS from OMW. Just keep it open all the time. You will need a project.

1. Create a VS makefile project
2. In the setup wizard add the following:
Include Search Path: C:\e900\system\include;C:\e900\DV900\include
Command: C:\e900\system\bin32\activConsole.exe

Your paths may vary. Command is optional. It allows you to launch JDE for debugging as an alternative to attaching to the process.

3. Add your .c and .h files by selecting "add existing...". You only need to add the files you are editing, Intellisense will dynamically parse all #includes.

4. Enjoy code completion, reference lookup, etc.

In addition to intellisense you can have project for what ever you are working on and if you have to go back you can see all the C source code files saved along with notes, breakpoints, bookmarks, etc.
worked very well, thank you. life will be easier
 

DBohner-(db)

Legendary Poster
Guys,

Ok - I'm lost. Or, maybe I just lake the familiarity with Intellisense?

Once a C programmer goes through B's steps - does Intellesense actually do the pop-ups and help with the code completion? If I understand, we start the typing and the 'process' gives us the hints to complete?

If so - shouldn't we make this a request to the b'Orgacle to make it work fully within the toolset?

Does it work with VS 2010?
(db)
 

BOster

Legendary Poster
shouldn't we make this a request to the b'Orgacle to make it work fully within the toolset?
Yes full code completion, jump to symbol definition, etc. Only worked in theory with VS2005, worked OK in VS2008 (hit and miss). Is absolutely rock solid in VS2010 (MS completely re-wrote Intellisense). In fact if I am typing along and I type something like "lpDS->" and I hit [ctrl][space] and DON'T get a list of lpDS params to select from it is 100% that I have a syntax error some place higher in my code, forgot an #include or something like that... in other words if Intellisense doesn't work it is always my fault.

There really is no need to have Oracle do anything IMO. You can easily do it yourself (takes about 10 seconds to set up a new VS project) - I wouldn't use the JDE "toolset" anyway. I have Visual Studio Projects for all of my various JDE related projects that contain all the source files that I edit as part of those JDE projects (by "JDE projects" I mean in an abstract way, not an OMW project but instead a solution that I am working on in JDE). Most of the time when I start working on something related to what I have worked on in the past I just open my old VS project and it all ready has all of my source files along with saved break points, bookmarks, notes, etc. So I rarely even have to go through the steps I described above to create a new VS project. For example if I get a request to changes something in Sales Orders I simply open my "Sales Order" VS project and it has all the various BSFN source files that I usually edit. If I need to add a new one as part of the latest dev request, I do so and then it is there the next time I open my VS project.

A little history:
This was only possible starting with VS2005. In VC++6 you would only have browse info (code completion, etc.) for the files that were phyisically in your VC++ 6 project. Which means you would have needed to add EVERY BSFN .h file and EVERY system\include file to your project and then wait for the next 10 days for VC++ 6 to parse everyting and create your 10 terabyte browse file.

Starting with VS2005/VS2008 they re-wrote Intellisence to dynamically parse #includes. This means that if you create a BSFN and add it to a VS2010 project it will find the "#include <jde.h>" line at the top of your BSFN's .c file and dynamically parse all the info in jde.h and include that in the browse info. Further more it will find alld the #include directives in jde.h and parse those as well along with all their #includes and so on, and so, and so on. If you add "#include <B4200310.h>" to either your .c or .h file in your BSFN it will automatically parse B4200310.h... along with all of it's #includes, etc.

Quite honestly, I don't know if I could code a BSFN w/o code completion I have been using it for so long... I can't remember the last time I actually used my [shift] key while writing code.
 

nkuebelbeck

VIP Member
Yes full code completion, jump to symbol definition, etc. Only worked in theory with VS2005, worked OK in VS2008 (hit and miss). Is absolutely rock solid in VS2010 (MS completely re-wrote Intellisense). In fact if I am typing along and I type something like "lpDS->" and I hit [ctrl][space] and DON'T get a list of lpDS params to select from it is 100% that I have a syntax error some place higher in my code, forgot an #include or something like that... in other words if Intellisense doesn't work it is always my fault.

There really is no need to have Oracle do anything IMO. You can easily do it yourself (takes about 10 seconds to set up a new VS project) - I wouldn't use the JDE "toolset" anyway. I have Visual Studio Projects for all of my various JDE related projects that contain all the source files that I edit as part of those JDE projects (by "JDE projects" I mean in an abstract way, not an OMW project but instead a solution that I am working on in JDE). Most of the time when I start working on something related to what I have worked on in the past I just open my old VS project and it all ready has all of my source files along with saved break points, bookmarks, notes, etc. So I rarely even have to go through the steps I described above to create a new VS project. For example if I get a request to changes something in Sales Orders I simply open my "Sales Order" VS project and it has all the various BSFN source files that I usually edit. If I need to add a new one as part of the latest dev request, I do so and then it is there the next time I open my VS project.

A little history:
This was only possible starting with VS2005. In VC++6 you would only have browse info (code completion, etc.) for the files that were phyisically in your VC++ 6 project. Which means you would have needed to add EVERY BSFN .h file and EVERY system\include file to your project and then wait for the next 10 days for VC++ 6 to parse everyting and create your 10 terabyte browse file.

Starting with VS2005/VS2008 they re-wrote Intellisence to dynamically parse #includes. This means that if you create a BSFN and add it to a VS2010 project it will find the "#include <jde.h>" line at the top of your BSFN's .c file and dynamically parse all the info in jde.h and include that in the browse info. Further more it will find alld the #include directives in jde.h and parse those as well along with all their #includes and so on, and so, and so on. If you add "#include <B4200310.h>" to either your .c or .h file in your BSFN it will automatically parse B4200310.h... along with all of it's #includes, etc.

Quite honestly, I don't know if I could code a BSFN w/o code completion I have been using it for so long... I can't remember the last time I actually used my [shift] key while writing code.
Back before all this I would get constant tiny syntax errors when compiling. This definitely speeds up the process of development/testing
 
Top