JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Work Center Load Review Calendar

generyken

Member
Our organization just heard about this. Is anyone using it? I'd like to know how much set up is involved, how it works, etc. Does it require you to use the CRP module?

Thanks
 

RussellCodlin

Reputable Poster
Set up isn't too bad but takes a little bit of work. Obviously you need the new 9.1.5.3 tools to start with. You then need to configure and deploy both the AIS and ADF servers and finally the ESUs for the app itself. The AIS server isn't too bad but our experience was that the ADF documentation is a bit of a first draft and took a bit of interpretation. You don't need to use CRP, it is just a graphical view of the work centre load vs resource capacity by day. So if you make a change to a work order routing step that change is reflected immediately (with refresh) in the calendar view or alternatively if you change the resource hours for a work centre you see those changes in the calendar.

At the moment we have an open call with Oracle trying to work out how to get the whole thing to work behind a load balance or reverse proxy because it does some funky URL passing to get the "seamlessness" to work. If we can figure that part out then we'll include the ADF components in our online demo system that people can have a look at.

Oracle have created document 1990959.1 to bring all of the details together. Just a tip, make sure you take note of the "note" at the bottom of the page because that one stumped us for a few hours.
 

serenity_now

Active Member
Set up isn't too bad but takes a little bit of work. Obviously you need the new 9.1.5.3 tools to start with. You then need to configure and deploy both the AIS and ADF servers and finally the ESUs for the app itself. The AIS server isn't too bad but our experience was that the ADF documentation is a bit of a first draft and took a bit of interpretation. You don't need to use CRP, it is just a graphical view of the work centre load vs resource capacity by day. So if you make a change to a work order routing step that change is reflected immediately (with refresh) in the calendar view or alternatively if you change the resource hours for a work centre you see those changes in the calendar.

At the moment we have an open call with Oracle trying to work out how to get the whole thing to work behind a load balance or reverse proxy because it does some funky URL passing to get the "seamlessness" to work. If we can figure that part out then we'll include the ADF components in our online demo system that people can have a look at.

Oracle have created document 1990959.1 to bring all of the details together. Just a tip, make sure you take note of the "note" at the bottom of the page because that one stumped us for a few hours.

Sorry to bump such an old thread, but a quick question. Did you install a separate ADF server, and then from within JD Edwards you created the menu task that points to the application on that separate server? Or is the ADF server and JAS server somehow combined? I read the install guide and it's a little confusing. The ADF server also needs a database repository?
 

RussellCodlin

Reputable Poster
The ADF server needs to be separate to your JAS server. AIS and JAS can coexist in the same WebLogic instance but the ADF cannot.

In terms of hooking it all up, everybody needs to be aware of each other. So the JAS server needs to know about the AIS server and the ADF server and the ADF server needs to know about the AIS server and the AIS server needs to know about the JAS server. The way it works is - you log into the JAS server as normal but when you do this the JAS server sends back a JavaScript file which causes the browser to open a session on the ADF server by giving it a token which it passes to the AIS server to authenticate against the JAS server with. You then launch the "app" like normal in the JAS session but again, the JAS server knows this is an ADF component and so it actually launches the ADF component (sort of like the way that OneView works). You can then launch apps from within the ADF component but this is just taking advantage of URL links back into the JAS server. As you have opened a session on both the ADF and JAS instance at the same time you can pull this stunt off. There is javascript running as a heartbeat on the JAS pages to keep the ADF session open. This is why you need to have a longer timeout on your ADF and AIS servers than you have on your JAS servers to ensure that the ADF session is still active whilst your JAS session is active.

As I mentioned in the original post, stick a load balancer and reverse proxy with SSL endpoint in the middle of all of that and see how you go. We got it to work but had to reverse engineer all of the REST calls to figure out what the hell was going on and what settings needed to go where. You also have to be rather artistic in terms of maintaining sticking sessions on the load balancer side.

And yes, ADF requires a database.
 
Discover how to build no-code data integrations and business process automations.
Top